TUTORIALS

Tutorials are a fun and educational tradition of the IEEE-PVSC Annual Conference. These extended sessions will take place the Sunday before the conference event dates. Tutorials give a deep insight into selected research & development topics and serve both as an expert review of the field for all, as well as an introduction for newcomers. The tutorials are given by some of the most recognized and experienced scientists in the field. All tutorials come with a set of slides which are an indispensable source of information that you will not find anywhere else!

Tutorial sessions will take place on Sunday, June 11, 2023.
AM Tutorials will start at 9am Atlantic Standard Time and PM Tutorials will start at 1pm Atlantic Standard Time.

Tutorial Sessions

Tutorial AM1: Fundamentals of Photovoltaics
Tutorial AM2: PV Systems Modeling with Python, an Interactive Introduction
Tutorial AM3: Tandems / Multijunction Solar Cells
Tutorial AM4: Grid / Energy Integration


Tutorial PM1: Performance Testing of PV Cells and Modules
Tutorial PM2: Terahertz Spectroscopy: A Contact Free Probe of Photoconductivity
Tutorial PM3: Multiscale Characterization of PV Degradation and Performance Limitations


Click below to learn more about each tutorial.


Tutorial AM1: Fundamentals of Photovoltaics

Instructor:
TBD











Tutorial AM2: PV Systems Modeling with Python, an Interactive Introduction



Instructors:
Silvana Ayala Pelaez, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA
Mark Mikofski, DNV, USA











Tutorial AM3: Tandems / Multijunction Solar Cells





Instructor:
Myles Steiner, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA
Emily Warren, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA

Myles Steiner is a senior scientist in the High Efficiency Crystalline Photovoltaics group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, in Golden, Colorado, where he works on III-V multijunction solar cells for terrestrial and space power generation, thermophotovoltaics for energy storage, and hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical water splitting.

Emily Warren is a staff scientist in the High Efficiency Crystalline Photovoltaics group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, in Golden, Colorado, where she focuses on the fabrication and modeling of multi-terminal tandem solar cells and modules. She also studies novel architectures for the creation of solar fuels and dabbles in heteroepitaxial growth of III-V materials on silicon nanoimprint lithography.

 









Tutorial AM4: Grid / Energy Integration

Instructor:
TBD











Tutorial AM5: Tandems / Multijunction Solar Cells





Instructor:
Myles Steiner, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA
Emily Warren, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA

Description
This tutorial will give a general introduction to the field of multijunction solar cells for the use in terrestrial and space systems. It will start from basic theoretical considerations and explain the benefits of using several pn-junctions to convert the broad solar spectrum into electricity. Since III-Vs have historically dominated the field of multijunctions and high efficiency photovoltaics, we will review the III-V alloy system and the various techniques that are available for growing these highly crystalline semiconductors. Some of the specific requirements for the use of multijunctions in different environments will be introduced, such as high current capacity for concentrators, radiation hardness for space applications, and low cost for one-sun applications.

New and on-going efforts toward hybrid tandems, combining cells of different material systems, will then be covered in detail. Silicon- and perovskite-based multijunction devices offer the promise of similarly high conversion efficiencies as traditional tandem III-Vs, but at a fraction of the cost. However, these integrated materials systems also come with unique issues that arise due to the various dissimilarities between the materials and the fabrication processes required for different technologies. We will look at the advantages and disadvantages of different material and interconnection combinations (e.g. 2T, 3T, 4T) in terms of efficiency, cost, and scalability.

Myles Steiner is a senior scientist in the High Efficiency Crystalline Photovoltaics group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, in Golden, Colorado, where he works on III-V multijunction solar cells for terrestrial and space power generation, thermophotovoltaics for energy storage, and hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical water splitting.

Emily Warren is a staff scientist in the High Efficiency Crystalline Photovoltaics group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, in Golden, Colorado, where she focuses on the fabrication and modeling of multi-terminal tandem solar cells and modules. She also studies novel architectures for the creation of solar fuels and dabbles in heteroepitaxial growth of III-V materials on silicon nanoimprint lithography.

 









Tutorial PM1: Performance Testing of PV Cells and Modules





Instructor:
Nikos Kopidakis, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA
Tao Song, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA











Tutorial PM2: Terahertz Spectroscopy: A Contact Free Probe of Photoconductivity

Instructor:
Jens Neu, University of North Texas, USA











Tutorial PM3: Multiscale Characterization of PV Degradation and Performance Limitations

Instructor:
Harvey Guthrey, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA
Steve Johnston, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA











Tutorial PM4: Foundations of Future Photovoltaic Technologies: Perovskite and Organic PV

Instructor: Joe Berry, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA

Description
This tutorial focusses on state of the art in metal halide perovskite photovoltaics. Current material challenges for metal halide perovskite photovoltaics will be discussed and compared to current issues in challenges in other nascent thin-film technologies (e.g. organic photovoltaics). Key considerations of device physics as well as how absorber and contact material choices can make or break the success of these technologies will be covered. Advances in material and device architectures will also be discussed.

Joseph J Berry is a Senior Research Fellow at NREL and member of NREL's National Center for Photovoltaics, where he is the team lead of the hybrid perovskite solar cell program. He conducts research on charge transport at the interface in all-inorganic and organic/inorganic interfaces for optoelectronic devices and systems. Past work includes contributions to development of contacts for organic photovoltaics and optoelectronics more broadly. He is also a Fellow of the Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute (RASEI) a joint institute between NREL and the University of Colorado. He is also a professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Colorado.

 









Tutorial PM5: Cost & Technology Trends Analysis: PV Supply Chains & PV Systems Coupled with Storage







Instructors:
Michael Woodhouse, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA
David Feldman, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA
Vignesh Ramasamy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA
Brittany Smith, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA

Description
This tutorial will highlight the most recent efforts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to track solar photovoltaic (PV) technology trends and manufacturing costs, project levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), and project levelized cost of solar plus storage (LCOSS) for systems across the globe.

We will begin with an overview of the global PV supply chain and 2021 benchmark input data for NREL’s crystalline silicon (c-Si) and thin film PV module manufacturing cost models. The framework that we follow and will review during this tutorial provides a methodology to prepare bottom-up manufacturing cost models including the items within the U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). For the polysilicon, wafer, cell conversion, and module assembly steps of the c-Si supply chain, and for thin film modules, we will review input data and methods useful for calculating the costs of goods sold (COGS); research and development (R&D) expenses; and sales, general, and business administration (S, G, &A) expenses. This 2021 benchmark analysis is compiled for state-of-the-art c-Si and thin film module manufacturing.

We will also review methods for our 2021 system benchmark costs calculations and LCOE technoeconomic analysis of PV systems and solar plus storage systems. Next generation technologies that lower PV manufacturing and installation costs, reduce operations and maintenance (O&M) expenses, and improve system energy yield will also be highlighted. Techniques for comparing LCOE performance will also be reviewed. We look forward to sharing NREL's extensive work in these areas and discussing ideas for future directions.

Michael Woodhouse is a senior analyst and the co-principal investigator with Robert Margolis for NREL’s solar and storage technoeconomic analysis portfolio, which currently includes work in designing and developing bottom-up manufacturing cost modelling software, conducting PV system levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) and levelized cost of solar plus storage (LCOSS) calculations, tracking current global solar and storage policy issues, and identifying research and development priorities for an accelerated global transition to clean and sustainable energy. Dr. Woodhouse also serves as the Associate Editor for Energy Economics and Policy for the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy and on the Steering Committee for the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV).

David Feldman has over 15 years of experience in the energy and financial industries. Currently he is a Senior Financial Analyst for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), helping the organization carry out a wide range of analytical activities related to financial, policy and market developments in the solar industry. David has published and presented widely on topics related to renewable energy project finance, PV system and component modeling, public capital in the renewable energy sector, innovative financial models, and solar market development. Before working for NREL, David was the Assistant Director of Finance for Soltage, a developer and owner/operator of solar power projects. David graduated with an MBA from the Yale School of Management, with a focus in finance, and Amherst College with a BA in philosophy.

Vignesh Ramasamy is a member of the Distributed Systems and Storage Group in the Integrated Applications Center at National Renewable Energy Laboratory and he has 5+ years of experience conducting techno-economic analysis of PV and Energy Storage applications. At NREL his primary focus is on building and validating the system cost models for different technologies.

Brittany Smith is a solar techno-economic analyst at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Her areas of expertise are photovoltaic manufacturing supply chains, techno-economic analysis, and life cycle assessment. Her past work includes engineering and light management in III-V photovoltaic devices. She is currently serving as the Area 11 chair for PVSC-49, and holds a B.A. in Chemistry from the University of Delaware and Ph.D. in sustainability from the Rochester Institute of Technology.